God’s Work, Our Hands

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Our Savior’s worship on God’s Work, Our Hands day, 2019.

Deuteronomy 30:15-20
Luke 14:25-33

It seems to me that we’ve got two conflicting messages in our Old Testament and Gospel readings. 

Don’t worry; we’ve got work to do. It’s God’s Work, Our Hands day, so you can bet this won’t take long. But I had to point this one thing out, and then we’ll talk about it, and then I’ll teach you a song with some motions, and then we’ll go help some people. Sound good, everyone? Good.

So the Old Testament reading says this: “Choose life, so that you and your descendants may live.” 

Despite its being hijacked as a political slogan, the phrase “choose life” still rings with truth. Choose blessing, not cursing. Choose good, not evil. Choose kindness, not meanness. Choose life, not death.

We have a choice, Deuteronomy says, and we can choose life. 

Then comes Jesus, complicating things. He’s telling us to take up that cross. The cross, which, to his original listeners, would have represented death at the hands of the Roman Empire. His mostly Jewish audience in the first century had been raised all their lives with Deuteronomy, being told to follow the law, and in so doing, to choose life. And Deuteronomy also says “cursed is everyone who hangs on a tree” (Deuteronomy 21:23). In case you were wondering, yes, a cross counts as a tree.

Of course, he’s not actually telling them to choose death. But he is telling them to give their lives, and later on, their possessions. If we ever really want a scorched earth stewardship policy one year, we should definitely use that last verse, 14:33: “So therefore, none of you can become my disciple if you do not give up all your possessions.” Sound good, Barb?

Wait, does Diego count as a possession? I’m out.

Everyone, from the most fundamentalist to the least literalist biblical reader imaginable, tries to talk their way out of this one. We try to explain why Jesus didn’t really mean that.

But what if he did?

As Lutherans, we believe that you don’t, and that you can’t, do anything to earn God’s grace. It’s a free gift. Becoming a disciple of Jesus isn’t even required — a disciple, after all, is a learner. Being Jesus’ disciple isn’t the same as scoring a ticket to heaven. 

Being Jesus’ disciple, for a Lutheran, isn’t about earning God’s love by giving up everything. You can’t earn God’s love; you can only live in response to it. And what do you give the God who has everything?

Just taking a gander here, but knowing Jesus, the answer seems to be: your whole life. Carry that cross and give your life. Give your limited waking hours on this earth to make someone else’s life better. And in so doing, especially in this divisive day and age, we are choosing life. 

That’s the thing about us humans. We’re fragile, and no one knows how long they have. To give up precious moments of life on a nice day in September to help someone else is a sacrifice. 

But here’s the thing: not long after he tells everyone to take up their cross, Jesus dies on one, but every one of you knows that it’s not the end. We pop champagne every Saturday night before Easter because new life walked right out of the grave. 

When I was a pastor in Montgomery, they had a tradition of having a flower cross on Easter. Because it’s the South, everyone’s garden is already flowering by Easter. Everyone brings flowers and puts them in the chicken wire-and-wood wrapped cross.

Let me tell you, that cross is ugly without the flowers. We used it on Good Friday, a twist of wood and metal, glaring with death, and ugly. When the congregation arrived on Sunday, though, it was full of flowers, teeming with life, transformed. 

That’s the opportunity we have today: to give away moments of our one wild and precious life [apologies to Mary Oliver] to our neighbors, so that they can be safe and so that they can have food. And if Jesus shows anything, it’s that we get back everything we give away, tenfold. We give not because we have to, but because we’re grateful. We give because we believe that it is in giving that we receive. We give because God first gave life and breath to us. So let’s give, gladly, not so that God will love us, but because God loves us. Let’s give because God transforms everything, even death, into new life, always. 

Even when death chooses us, God chooses life for us. Turns out there’s no contradiction there at all.

And with that, I want to teach you a song.

To hear the song taught and sung by David Piper, the original composer/songwriter, click here!

Word of God, word of life. Thanks be to God. Amen.

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